July 8, 2011Vol. 13, No. 5

An aerial view of the Channel, ca. 1940. Long Pond is at the top. More . . .


Cover Story

Changes In The Channel

To the first explorers and settlers in the second half of the 18th century, the waterway was just a stream, connecting one lake to another and looking pretty much like a good site for a mill or two or three. By the early 20th century, the mills had closed and the stream had become an idyllic passage to ideal fishing. More . . .

Editorial

A Quiet Corner For Teens

Year round residents and summer seasonal teens are invited to meet, mingle, and move into a beautifully rebuilt and restored cottage located on the waterfront in a quiet corner of the Center For All Seasons property and find a space of their own created and offered as a contribution to the community by a group of local contractors, builders and craftsmen. More . . .

Kennebec
Corridor

Augusta's Museum in the Streets Features Sites Along the Kennebec

Water Street, Front Street, Cony, Willow and Canal Streets form the Kennebec riverfront area that is Augusta's Museum in the Streets. Finished in 2009, the downtown tour features 38 historic locations, marked by signs in English and French and containing detailed site descriptions. More . . .

Fishing

It's Been a Great Week!

There were so many highlights from this past week that's it hard to pick a starting point! The fishing was great, the company was even better, and the weather was really pretty good too. More . . .

Pet
World

More Pain Relief, Please!

They say the only good thing about pain is when it stops. Actually pain does serve a purpose when it alerts us that potential damage will occur if the body continues to be used in ways which cause the pain. For example, pain reminds a dog with a broken toe not to put too much weight on that foot, because the bone will not heal with constant motion. This warning system is somewhat crude, though, and at some point, when we get the warning loud and clear, it is OK to make the pain stop. More . . .

Business

Skowhegan Kneading Conference Gets $48,000 Grant

What began as a grassroots project to revive the struggling Skowhegan economy by bringing back local grain production and artisan bread baking has grown into an annual event that brings over 250 farmers, millers, novice and professional bakers, bread-lovers, and wood-fired oven enthusiasts to central Maine each July. Now in its fifth year, the Kneading Conference is the model of regional enterprise that connects the local grain farmer to the miller, the baker, and the consumer. It also is the recipient of a substantial grant that benefits Skowhegan, Somerset County, and the state. More . . .